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News & Events

The Farm in the Forest: Historical Ecology of the Mansfield – Yale – Chattleton Farm at Great Mountain Forest

January 11, 2020

Michael Gaige will speak on Yale University’s Forestry Camp at Great Mountain Forest, which was built by Ted Childs in 1941 on the site of an old farm. That farm was settled by Elisha Mansfield in 1795 and eventually passed through three families over the next 115 years. By about 1910 the farming was finished on the 300-acre property and most of the farm reverted back to forest. We’ll look at the history of the farm as revealed by the trees, the rocks, and the ground, as well as information gleaned from archives dating back to the first land grants during the Colony of Connecticut.
Michael Gaige is an independent consulting ecologist based in upstate New York. His work often explores the intersection of nature, culture, and history. He works with organizations and private landowners on research and management projects. Michael co-wrote the Great Mountain Forest Field Book in 2015.

Location:

Center on Main, 103 Main St., Falls Village, CT 06031

Time:

4:00 p.m.

Fee:

Free

Deer and Tick-Borne Diseases: Concerns For Forest and Public Health Alike”

February 8, 2020

Scott Williams will speak on how white-tailed deer have had a tumultuous existence in Connecticut over the past two centuries, from being driven to near extinction to being so abundant they are a threat to public safety and forest health. Not only are deer vital hosts for blacklegged or “deer” ticks, but they are also ecosystem engineers and can dictate tree species diversity and abundance. It has been becoming increasingly evident, largely due to deer, that human and forest health are linked. Scott will discuss why proper forest management is vitally important to benefit the health of Connecticut’s citizenry.
Scott Williams received his BA from Connecticut College, his master’s from the Yale School of Forestry, and his Ph.D. in Natural Resources from the University of Connecticut. He is a Scientist in the Department of Forestry and Horticulture at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station in New Haven. His research focuses on making connections between the health of Connecticut’s forested ecosystems and its people.

Location:

Norfolk Library, 9 Greenwoods Rd. East, Norfolk, CT 06058

Time:

4:00 p.m.

Fee:

Free