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PREVIOUS WEATHER REPORTS

December 2007

White Christmas in Norfolk

By Russell Russ

Here are the weather highlights from December 2007 as recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation. Norfolk 2SW has recorded weather observations since January 1, 1932.

The month’s low temperature of 8 degrees was observed on December 6. The high temperature of 54 degrees was observed on December 23. The average temperature this month was 26.0 degrees which was 1.4 degrees above normal.

The total precipitation recorded for the month was 6.22 inches. This was 1.64 inches above normal. The snowfall total was 22.6 inches. Although this was 5.1 inches above a normal December’s snowfall total, it was by no means a record amount. The snowstorm on December 13 was by far the biggest, dumping 11 inches at the station. There was a snow cover on the ground at the station every day this month. Carrying a solid 8 inches on the ground on December 25, we did have a white Christmas this year.

The month of December had 31 days. Of those 31 days we recorded some sort of precipitation on 22 of them. There were 15 days where sleet or snow was observed. Only one day was recorded as being mostly clear all day. Both Tobey Pond and Wangum Lake froze over for the season on December 6.
In a review of Norfolk’s weather for the 2007 calendar year it appears that we had a fairly typical weather year. There were some low figures and some high figures observed throughout the year, but on average it all summed up to be fairly normal. Norfolk’s 2007 yearly average temperature was 46.0 degrees. This was 1.6 degrees above normal. The yearly total precipitation amount was 48.17 inches. This was 4.32 inches below normal. The yearly snowfall total was 66.6 inches. This was 29.5 inches below normal. Looking back to the end of November it appeared that we may be flirting with top ten records for lack of total precipitation and lack of snowfall, but December changed all that. A common statement being made these days by many weather experts is that we can expect to see big swings in both temperature and precipitation. For now, it appears that they seem to know what they are talking about.

November 2007

A Fairly Typical November for Norfolk

By Russell Russ

A summary of November’s weather as recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation.

The month’s high temperature of 58 degrees was observed on November 22. The low temperature of 14 degrees was observed on November 24. The average temperature this month was 36.2 degrees which was just 0.5 degrees below normal.

The total precipitation recorded for the month was 3.75 inches. This was 1.08 inches below normal. There were a few rumbles of thunder at the station on the morning of November 15. The total precipitation for 2007 through November is now 41.95 inches. Comparing this to the last 75 years we are now 5.96 inches below an average year. It has been a dry year, but not really all that record setting. At the current rate it could be among our top ten for least amount of yearly precipitation.

The month of November on average receives 8.2 inches of snow. This year we saw only 1.5 inches. The first real, measurable snowfall of this winter season came on the morning of November 20. Our snowfall total for the 2007 calendar year is nearing record levels for low snowfall totals. From January through November we have recorded just 44 inches of snow. At this point we are 34.6 inches below normal. At this rate 2007 will easily be among the top five least snowy years that Norfolk has seen in the last seventy-five.

The month started out just as October ended, on a warm note. Many trees were still loaded with leaves. Many people’s leaf raking plans had to be put off for about two weeks until finally they started to fall. There were a number of big temperature swings during the month. On November 15 between 9:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. the temperature dropped 13 degrees and by 3:00 p.m. it had dropped a total of 20 degrees. Another big temperature drop occurred between November 22 and 24 where we recorded our monthly high and low temperatures in a time span of just 36 hours. Thanksgiving was rain and snow free and quite warm which made for good travel weather for one of the busiest travel times of the year.

October 2007

Second Warmest October in Last 75 Years

By Russell Russ

Here are the weather highlights from October as recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation.

The month’s high temperature of 80 degrees was observed on both October 5 and 6. A high temperature of 77 degrees on October 4 was a record high for that date, beating the old record of 75 degrees set in 1983. The high of 80 degrees on October 6 was also a record high for that date, surpassing the old record of 76 set in 1990. The low temperature of 27 degrees was observed on October 29. The average temperature this month was 54.3 degrees which was 6.8 degrees above normal. This was the second warmest October in the last 75 years, falling behind only October 2001 which recorded an average temperature of 55.3 degrees. Had it not been for the cool temperatures during the last three days of the month this October would have been the warmest.

The first frost of the season was finally observed at the weather station on October 29, with another coming on October 30. In addition to these dates there were scattered light frosts in some low lying valleys on October 13, 26 and 31.

The total precipitation recorded for the month was 5.23 inches. This was 1.24 inches above normal. There were thunderstorms observed on October 9 and 11. The total precipitation for 2007 through October is now 38.20 inches. Comparing this to the last 75 years we are now 4.88 inches below an average year. The month of October on average receives a little less than one inch of snow, but this year we saw none. This year marked the twentieth anniversary of the big October snowstorm that dumped 9.5 inches on Norfolk. The snow that fell October 4, 1987 was the largest snowfall recorded for an October in our 75 year history.

By the end of the month there were still many trees loaded with leaves. The season seemed to be at least two weeks later than usual this year. This year October seemed more like a September. We had another warm, dry Halloween that made for great treat-or-treating conditions for the kids. We just missed our fifth consecutive Halloween with temperatures of 60 degrees or higher. All we could manage at the station was 58 degrees, but I’m sure there were places in town that did hit the 60 degree mark.

September 2007

Some record setting warmth during another warm and dry month

By Russell Russ

Here are the weather highlights from September as recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation. Norfolk 2SW has recorded weather observations since January 1, 1932.

The high temperature this month was 87 degrees which was observed on September 8. The month’s low temperature of 37 degrees was observed on September 17. The average temperature this month was 62.5 degrees which was 4.2 degrees above normal. This was the fourth warmest September in the last 75 years. There were three record setting warm days this month. The 86 degrees on September 7 (was 85 degrees in 1945), 85 degrees on September 26 (was 80 degrees in 1970) and 80 degrees on September 27 (was 76 in 1933) were all record setting warm days according to our 75 years of record keeping.

It was a dry month, but not really record setting for us. The total precipitation recorded for the month was 2.88 inches which was 1.77 inches below normal. Interestingly, 2.47 inches of the month’s total rainfall occurred in a 24 hour time span between September 10 and 11. Norfolk’s total precipitation for 2007 through September is now 32.97 inches. Comparing this to the last 75 years we are now 6.12 inches below an average year.

Norfolk received some much needed rain on September 10 and 11. On September 10 from 3:30 pm to 4:30 pm the weather station at Great Mountain Forest recorded 1.30 inches of rain. On September 11 there was 0.30 inches recorded between 8:00 am and 11:30 am. Then, between 1:15 pm and 2:00 pm more waves of heavy rain hit Norfolk dumping an additional 0.82 inches. After the rains finally stopped the total two day rain total was 2.47 inches, more than half of our normal monthly rainfall amount for September. As it turned out the total precipitation for the entire month was just 2.88 inches, the 14th driest month on record. Had it not been for this two day rain event we just may have recorded the driest month in all our 75 years of weather observing.

The only day when a thunderstorm was observed at the station was September 8 when two separate storms hit Norfolk during the late afternoon and early evening. Not much rain fell during either one. There were light frosts in certain low lying valleys during the early morning hours of September 17, 18 and 19.

If you like beautiful late summer weather with pleasant temperatures and clear skies this was the month for you. In fact, twenty-six out of thirty days this month were like that. Five of those days some people would say were just too warm. Is it possible to complain that there are too many nice days? You could almost hear it.

August 2007

A very dry month

By Russell Russ

Here are the weather highlights from August as recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation. Norfolk 2SW has recorded weather observations since January 1, 1932.

The month’s low temperature of 46 degrees was observed on August 11 and again on August 19. The high temperature of 90 degrees was observed on August 25. The average temperature this month was 67.6 degrees which was 1.7 degrees above normal. Through the summer months we managed to hit the 90 degree mark once in July and once again in August. This is just about normal for a Norfolk summer.

The total precipitation recorded for the month was 1.92 inches. This was 2.64 inches below normal. Here at the station in Norfolk it was our eighth driest August in the last 75 years. Bradley International Airport, with just 0.66 inches of rain, recorded its third driest August on record. Norfolk’s total precipitation for 2007 through August is now 30.09 inches. Comparing this to the last 75 years we are now 4.35 inches below an average year.

This month’s only thunderstorm occurred on August 17. It came with a little wind that did cause some minor tree damage and a relatively brief power outage here in town. No tornados here, but on August 8 in a very rare event one did hit the New York City area.

There were about 9 days this month with typical hot and humid weather, but thankfully no prolonged heat waves. There were about 15 really nice days with a few that made it seem like early autumn. Here in Norfolk you can usually start to see a little fall color towards the end of August, but this year due to the dry conditions you could really start seeing some spotty color as early as the second week of the month and by month’s end there was noticeable color just about everywhere you looked. Last year the maples were sick and didn’t provide much autumn color. This year we are getting an early showing and it looks like it may be a colorful autumn.

July 2007

More Classic Summertime

By Russell Russ

As recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation.

July 2007

High Temperature: 90 degrees on the 10th

Low temperature: 48 degrees on the 2nd

Average Temperature: 68.0 degrees (0.2 degrees above normal)

Total Precipitation: 5.90” (1.79 inches above normal)

Worth Noting:

  • On average, Norfolk gets to 90 degrees or higher just 2.5 times per year. As of the end of July we’ve reached 90 degrees just once.
  • Norfolk finally received its fair share of summertime thunderstorms this month. We recorded seven thunderstorms this month with two days recording  two storms each. The storm on July 11 was the largest by far with 1.5” of rain falling in roughly 2 hours.
  • The total precipitation for 2007 through July was 28.17 inches. Comparing this to the last 75 years we are now 1.71 inches below an average year.
  • This month we had about ten really nice summer days and about fourteen hot humid days. All in all just normal summer weather for Norfolk.

June 2007

Classic Summertime in Norfolk

By Russell Russ

Here are the weather highlights from June as recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation. Norfolk 2SW has recorded weather observations since January 1, 1932.

The month’s low temperature of 39 degrees was observed on June 7. The high temperature of 89 degrees was observed twice, on June 26 and again on June 27. The high temperature of 89 on June 27 tied the record high temperature for that date for this station. We also reached 89 degrees back on June 27, 2002. The average temperature this month was 64.9 degrees which was 1.7 degrees above normal.

We have made it through June with no higher temperature than 89 degrees. On average, Norfolk gets to 90 degrees or higher just 2.5 times per year. According to our records here at the station the highest temperature observed in the last 75 years was 101 degrees observed on June 29, 1933.

The total precipitation recorded for the month was 2.27 inches. This was 2.40 inches below normal. The total precipitation for 2007 through June is now 22.27 inches. Comparing this to the last 75 years we are now 3.50 inches below an average year.

Norfolk continued its game of hide and seek with big thunderstorms throughout the entire month of June. The only thunderstorm observed at the station this month was on June 5. There were at least five other days when there were storms all around, but not here at the station. It could be just a matter of time.

There were about eight days this month with classic hot and humid weather, but thankfully no long heat waves to date. Really, only two days come to mind as just plain rainy and wet all day long. On the plus side there were at least 16 days of really nice, pleasant New England summer weather.

May 2007

Some nice weather and a bit warmer than normal

By Russell Russ

Here are the weather highlights from May as recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation. Norfolk 2SW has recorded weather observations since January 1, 1932.

The month’s low temperature of 32 degrees was observed on May 7. The high temperature of 85 degrees was observed on May 25. The average temperature this month was 57.6 degrees which was 3.0 degrees above normal.

The total precipitation recorded for the month was 1.93 inches. This was 2.53 inches below normal. There was no snowfall recorded this month. Every once in a while we do get snow during the month of May, but not this year. The total precipitation for 2007 through May is now exactly 20.00 inches. Comparing this to the last 75 years we are now just 1.10 inches below an average year. Now that it is the summer season we can take a welcomed break from talking about snow.

On May 16, 20 and 31 thunderstorms were observed at the station. Two separate storms hit late in the day on May 31. None of these storms produced hail. Although four thunderstorms were observed here, we were spared the severe storms that seemed to pop up all around the area. On May 16 severe storms hit parts of Torrington, Bethany and Ridgefield. The storms on May 31 were especially strong in parts of Colebrook, Winsted and Waterbury. This strange occurrence of strong storms seemingly all around, but not on top of, Norfolk continued into the first two weeks of June. If you watched the weather radar during these storms (doesn’t everybody?) you would have noticed many of them head straight for Norfolk only to just miss us or fall apart at the last moment. You have to wonder why Norfolk seems to be shielded from the strong ones — at least we have been so far this summer season.

All in all this month was quite pleasant weather-wise with a string of nice days from May 3 through May 10 and again from May 22 through the end of the month. Memorial Day was warm and a little humid this year, but with only a trace of rain it made for a nice day for Norfolk’s annual parade and road race.

April 2007-Part 2

The Nor’easter of April 15-17, 2007

By Russell Russ

A strong spring nor’easter came up the Atlantic Coast hitting the Norfolk area in the early morning hours of Sunday, April 15.

It started with a mix of rain and snow that turned to all wet snow by around 8 am Sunday. By 2 pm there was about 3 inches of heavy, slushy snow on the ground. Rain mixed in with the snow and by late Sunday afternoon it was all a steady rain that lasted all night into Monday morning. Overnight the rain and warmer temperatures cleared all the snow away.

The heaviest precipitation fell between about 9 am Sunday and 12 noon on Monday. In this 27 hour period Norfolk 2SW recorded approximately 4.5 inches of precipitation, part of which came in the form of wet snow. From the start of the storm through Tuesday, April 17 at 4 pm (when this article was written) the station recorded 4.83 inches of precipitation. It was still raining Tuesday afternoon with weather forecasts calling for more rain showers through Wednesday, April 18.

Many of Norfolk’s gravel roads sustained damage from the heavy rains. Many residents with gravel driveways also ran into trouble with wash-outs. It was a good test for the many flood control dams in the northwest corner of the state. With opening day of fishing season just 4 days away this storm must have created a major nightmare for the state’s DEP trout stocking program. The prospects for opening day look very bleak.

A quick glance at record April precipitation amounts reveals that this year is currently Norfolk’s seventh wettest April in the last 75 years. This year’s total precipitation through the afternoon of April 17 was 6.58 inches which was 2.14 inches above normal with the second half of the month still to come. We may make it into the top five wettest, but we’ll need to get over 8.2 inches to break into the top three. The wettest April recorded since 1932 was in 1983 when 10.79 inches were recorded.

April 2007-Part 1

Fourth wettest April on record

By Russell Russ

Here are the weather highlights from April as recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation. Norfolk 2SW has recorded weather observations since January 1, 1932.

The month’s high temperature of 82 degrees was observed on April 23. This was a record high temperature for that date. It replaced the old record of 79 degrees set back in 1996. The low temperature of 17 degrees was observed on April 7. The average temperature this month was 41.3 degrees which was 1.3 degrees below normal. On April 11 the ice went out on both Tobey Pond and Wangum Lake. Last year the ice went out between March 28 and March 30. Typically, the ice goes out sometime between late March and the first or second week of April.

The total precipitation recorded for the month was 7.62 inches. This was 3.18 inches above normal making this April the fourth wettest April in the last 75 years. For the record, April 1983 was first with 10.79 inches, followed by April 1987 with 8.65 inches and April 1996 with 8.20 inches. The nor’easter that hit the area on April 15 ended up dumping 4.95 inches of total precipitation, included in this total was the 3.5 inches of heavy wet snow that came at the start of the storm. The 4.5 inches of snowfall recorded for the month was 2.6 inches below the normal monthly snowfall amount.

Thanks to April’s rains the total precipitation for 2007 through April is 18.07 inches which is 1.43 inches above normal. The 2007 snow total of 42.5 inches is 26.6 inches below normal. This is potentially record setting for least amount of snowfall for a calendar year, but we must wait for this coming November and December to get our 2007 totals.

Our winter season (October through April) snowfall total was just 44.0 inches. Comparing this winter season to the last 75 years we were 52.1 inches below normal, ranking 2006-2007 as the season with the third least amount of snowfall. The least amount of snowfall for a winter season was 40.9 inches recorded in 1994-1995 followed by 43.7 inches recorded in 1991-1992.

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