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PREVIOUS WEATHER REPORTS

December 2006

Norfolk’s December 2006 Weather & a Yearly Summary for 2006

December was another unusually warm month in an unusually warm year

By Russell Russ

Here are the weather highlights from December as recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation. Norfolk 2SW has recorded weather observations since January 1, 1932. The conclusion of 2006 marked the completion of 75 full years of weather recording for this station.

The month’s high temperature of 63 degrees was recorded on Dec. 1. The low temperature of 8 degrees was recorded on Dec. 8. We got a quick taste of some cold weather during the first full week of the month. A wind chill temperature of 13 degrees below zero was recorded during the morning of Dec. 8. The cold was short lived and all in all it was a much warmer than normal December. This month was the second warmest December observed in the last 75 years. The month’s average temperature was 34.6 degrees which was a whopping 10 degrees above normal. December of 2001 was warmest with an average temperature of 36.0 degrees. The monthly precipitation of 2.22 inches was 2.36 inches below normal. There was one thunderstorm in the early evening of Dec.1. National Weather Service radar indicated three possible tornados in the Litchfield County area that evening prompting them to issue a tornado warning for our area. There was some wind damage around Litchfield County, but officially no tornados formed. There were six days with snow flurries or light snow, but all that could be measured was a total of 1.5 inches, a full 16 inches below the monthly normal. This month recorded the third least amount of snow for a December since we began keeping records. December 1943 was first with only 0.6 inches and Dec. 1999 was second with only 1.3 inches of snow.

The yearly (January – December) precipitation total for 2006 was 56.16 inches. This was 3.67 inches above a normal year, but nothing too special. The snowfall total for the year was a mere 50.4 inches making it the fourth least snow total for any year since 1932. The other years with record little snow totals are 1998 with 33.0 inches, 1999 with 44.1 inches and 2004 with 49.5 inches. The average temperature for the year was 47.8 degrees making it tied with 2002 as our third warmest year in the last 75 years. The warmest years were 1998 with 48.4 degrees followed by 2001 with 48.3 degrees.

November 2006

Warmest November on record

By Russell Russ

Here are the weather highlights from November as recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation. Norfolk 2SW has recorded weather observations since January 1, 1932.

The month’s high temperature of 64 degrees was recorded on Nov. 16. The low temperature of 22 degrees was recorded on Nov. 22. This month was a record setter. This station recorded the warmest November observed since we began keeping records. The month’s average temperature was 43.2 degrees which was 6.5 degrees above normal. The monthly precipitation of 5.26 inches was 0.43 inches above normal. There were heavy rains on Nov. 8 when over 2 inches fell and on Nov. 16-17 when nearly 1.5 inches fell. The only snow recorded was from a few flurries that fell on Nov. 3 and Nov. 20, making the monthly snowfall total fall way below normal. The station normally receives 8.2 inches of snow during November.

Taking a look at the 2006 yearly totals, through the month of November we have recorded 53.94 inches of precipitation, making us 6.03 inches above normal. With December still to be added in, the station has already recorded more precipitation than in a normal year. Our year to date snowfall total of only 48.9 inches is 29.7 inches below normal. Here in Norfolk we normally get about 96 inches of snow per year. If December is as snow free as November we could be looking at one of the top three least snowy years on record. For 2006 to reach the yearly normal snowfall amount, December will have to see over 4 feet of snow. Now that would be another record.

It has been said that November, especially the latter half of November, is the indicator for the type of winter that we will have. If this is true, we here in Norfolk are in for a cloudy, wet and warm winter. Only time will tell.

October 2006

Norfolk’s October 2006 Weather

By Russell Russ

Here are the weather highlights from October as recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation. Norfolk 2SW has recorded weather observations since January 1, 1932.

It was pretty much a normal October for Norfolk. There were no days that stood out with any sort of record. We did have our fourth consecutive Halloween with temperatures of 60 degrees or higher. The 68 degrees recorded on Halloween this year made for a very pleasant evening for treat-or-treating.

The month’s high temperature of 73 degrees was recorded on the 4th and the low of 25 degrees was recorded on the 27th. Our station is fairly high in elevation so there were most likely some even colder low temperatures observed in some of the area’s low lying valleys. The month’s average temperature was 46.9 degrees which was just 0.6 degrees below normal. The 5.99” of precipitation recorded was 2.00” above normal. There were heavy rains on the 11th and 12th and then again on the 28th. A few rumbles of thunder could be heard on the afternoon of the 28th. We saw our first snow flurries of the season on the morning of the 29th, but no measurable snow fell. October normally receives a little less than 1” of snow on average.

Looking at the 2006 yearly totals, through the month of October we have recorded 48.68” of precipitation, making us 5.60” above normal. Our year to date snowfall of only 48.9” is 21.5” below normal. Here in Norfolk we normally get about 96” of snow per year, so we would need just about 4 feet of snow from November 1st to the end of December to get to our normal yearly snowfall total.

September 2006

As recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation.

Norfolk 2SW has recorded weather observations since January 1, 1932.

September 2006

High Temperature: 77° F on the 9th

Low temperature: 34° F on the 30th

Average Temperature: 58.1° F (only 0.2° F below normal)

Total Precipitation: 3.95” (only 0.7” below normal)

Worth Noting:

  • This month was a typical September for Norfolk. No records were broken for temperature or precipitation. Some Norfolk residents in low lying valleys reportedly had frosts on the 12th and 22nd. This station did not record a frost until the early morning of the 30th. This is roughly two weeks later than our usual first frost of the season.
  • There was one thunderstorm recorded at the station in the late afternoon of the 9th which for a brief period did produce vivid lightning and a small amount of 1/8” sized hail. Precipitation for the month was just a little below normal. We are now 3.60” above normal for total precipitation for the year.
  • Fall Foliage Report: As many may have heard, or seen for themselves, all summer long our maple trees have been infected with Anthracnose fungi and during September it was really apparent with their early leaf browning and leaf drop. The northwest hills were hit especially hard with this fungus this year. Some say it was worse than ever recorded, making late September look like a typical late October. We missed the bright yellows and oranges of our sugar maples and it has many local maple syrup producers a bit nervous. The experts do say that there should be no permanent damage done to the trees and that the spring’s maple syrup season won’t be affected that much and that next summer we should again see the maples full of healthy leaves. Only time will tell.

August 2006

As recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation.

Norfolk 2SW has recorded weather observations since January 1, 1932.

August 2006

High Temperature: 92° F on the 1st and 2nd

Low temperature: 46° F on the 13th

Average Temperature: 67.2° F (1.3° F above normal)

Total Precipitation: 5.62” (1.06” above normal)

Worth Noting:

  • August 2nd’s high temperature of 92° was the record high temperature for that date for this weather station. August 1st and 2nd were the only two days all year that had a temperature of 90° or higher. This is fairly typical for Norfolk; on average we record only 2.5 days per year with temperatures of 90° or greater.
  • Precipitation for the month was a little above normal. We are now 4.30” above normal for total precipitation for the year. The thunderstorm recorded on the 7th was the only one this month.

July 2006

As recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation.

Norfolk 2SW has recorded weather observations since January 1, 1932.

July 2006

High Temperature: 89° F on the 17th and 18th

Low temperature: 54° F on the 1st and 7th

Average Temperature: 71.7° F (3.9° F above normal)

Total Precipitation: 1.98” (2.13” below normal)

Worth Noting:

  • For this weather station this month was the 2nd warmest July since 1932. It was actually tied with 1935 for the 2nd warmest July. The warmest July on record was in 1955 with an average temperature of 72.1°. July 17th’s high temperature of 89° tied the record high temperature for that date for this station. July 17, 1968 also recorded 89° as a high. In June we were wishing for warm summer-like weather and in July we got it.
  • Precipitation for the month was below normal, but we are still 3.24” above normal for total precipitation for the year. There were three thunderstorms recorded on the 3rd, 12th and 28th.
  • Thunderstorms and the threat of storms played havoc with some local Independence Day fireworks shows. Luckily we had only a quick passing shower in the early evening of the 29th, resulting in a wonderful night for Norfolk’s terrific fireworks display provided by Yale University’s Summer School of Music for their 100th Anniversary celebration.

June 2006

As recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation.

Norfolk 2SW has recorded weather observations since January 1, 1932.

June 2006

High Temperature: 88° F on the 18th

Low temperature: 46° F on the 11th

Average Temperature: 64.4° F (1.2° F above normal)

Total Precipitation: 7.75” (3.08” above normal)

Worth Noting:

  • What can we say about June’s weather? Simply put it was wet, wet, wet. There are many people that would add their own not so nice ways to describe the dreary weather that seemed to last all month. In June’s 30 days there were 14 mostly cloudy days, 10 partly to mostly cloudy days and 6 were clear. There were 21 days with measurable rainfall.
  • Norfolk recorded some moderately heavy rains during the month and in total it was an above average month for rainfall, but we were once again spared from the very large rainfall totals that other parts of the state and the country recorded during the month. There were four thunderstorms recorded on the 1st, 19th, 20th, and 29th. The storm on the 29th was quite strong at the station and even produced a little small 1/8” sized hail.
  • For this weather station June 2006 came in as the 9th wettest June since 1932. June 1986 with 10.41” was the wettest June on record for this station. For the period January through June 2006 we are now 5.37” above normal for precipitation.
  • The best we could do for warm weather was coming close to, but not breaking, record high temperatures on the 18th and 19th. Let’s hope July will bring us some pleasant summer weather!

May 2006

As recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation.

Norfolk 2SW has recorded weather observations since January 1, 1932.

May 2006

High Temperature: 84° F on the 30th

Low temperature: 37° F on the 7th

Average Temperature: 54.8° F (0.2° F above normal)

Total Precipitation: 6.86” (2.40” above normal)

Total Snowfall: 0” (0.5” below normal)

Worth Noting:

  • Generally the month began cool and wet and stayed that way until the last week when it turned warm and humid. Twenty-four of the thirty-one days of the month were either partly cloudy or totally cloudy.
  • Norfolk recorded some moderately heavy rains on the 11th, 12th and 19th. There were two thunderstorms recorded on the 21st and 26th. The storm on the 21st produced a little small 1/8” sized hail. Even though Norfolk recorded above average rainfall this month, we actually recorded less, and in some cases a lot less, rain than other areas of CT and neighboring MA.
  • For the months of January through May 2006 we are 2.29” above normal for total precipitation, but our 48.9” of snowfall is 20.7” below normal.
  • For the Winter Season of 2005-2006 (October 2005 through May 2006) our snowfall total is now 80.3”, which is 15.8” below normal.

April 2006

As recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation.

Norfolk 2SW has recorded weather observations since January 1, 1932.

April 2006

High Temperature: 73° F on the 20th

Low temperature: 26° F on the 5th and 9th

Average Temperature: 46.0° F (3.4° F above normal)

Total Precipitation: 5.48” (1.04” above normal)

Total Snowfall: 1.7” (5.4” below normal)

Worth Noting:

  • The rain, then snow, that fell on the 3rd and 4th and then the rain that fell over the weekend of the 22nd and 23rd provided a vast majority of the month’s total precipitation.
  • For the months of January through April 2006 we are only 0.11” below normal for total precipitation, but we are 20.2” below normal for snowfall.
  • For the Winter Season of 2005-2006 (October 2005 through April 2006) our snowfall total is now 80.3”, which is 15.3” below normal.
  • Even though the monthly precipitation total was a little above average, the state was under a Red Flag Warning for a number of days during the month.
  • Red Flag, as defined by the NWS, is a term used by fire-weather forecasters to call attention to limited weather conditions of particular importance that may result in extreme burning conditions. It is issued when it is an on-going event or the fire weather forecaster has a high degree of confidence that Red Flag criteria will occur within 24 hours of issuance. Red Flag criteria occurs whenever a geographical area has been in a dry spell for a week or two, or for a shorter period , if before spring green-up or after fall color, and the National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) is high to extreme and the following forecast weather parameters are forecasted to be met:
    1) a sustained wind average 15 mph or greater
    2) relative humidity less than or equal to 25% and
    3) a temperature of greater than 75° F.

March 2006

As recorded at Norfolk’s National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Observer Station, Norfolk 2SW, by the Great Mountain Forest Corporation.

Norfolk 2SW has recorded weather observations since January 1, 1932.

March 2006

High Temperature: 71° F on the 31st

Low temperature: 9° F on the 2nd

Average Temperature: 31.9° F (1.6° F above normal)

Total Precipitation: 1.00” (3.45” below normal)

Total Snowfall: 5.1” (13.6” below normal)

Worth Noting:

  • March 2006 went on record as having the 2nd least amount of precipitation for the month of March since records were kept here at this station. March of 1981 recorded .64”and is the record holder for least amount for the month of March. March 2006 was the 10th driest month of any month since records were kept here at this station. The Associated Press reported that in Connecticut this was the 3rd driest March in the last 100 years, with 1981 and 1915 being mentioned as drier months of March.
  • The 5” of snow on the 2nd and the small thunderstorm on the 13th provided almost all of the month’s precipitation.
  • For the months of January through March 2006 we are 1.15” below normal for precipitation and 14.8” below normal for snowfall.
  • For the Winter Season of 2005-2006 (October 2005 through March 2006) we are 9.9” below normal for snowfall.
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